Critical insights on nexus, home and transitions at the Sheffield workshop

img_9172The first ‘nexus at home’ workshop made for an excellent start to the series, with a morning of provocative talks warming us up well for some lively workshop activity orchestrated by Will Medd. An account of the day is over on the project blog, and can be accessed here.

No more meters? A piece on The Conversation with Elizabeth Shove

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From The Conversation, No More Meters – follow links

Imagine never again receiving an energy bill. Instead, you could pay a flat fee for “comfort”, “cleanliness” or “home entertainment” alongside a premium for more energy-demanding TVs, kettles or fridge-freezers. This isn’t the stuff of science fiction – it’s emerging right now. Recent changes in technology and regulation are enabling the development of new ways to provide electricity and gas.

 

Read more at The Conversation – No more meters?

Conceptualising connections: energy demand, infrastructures and social practices

open access version here

In this paper we focus on the task of understanding and analysing car dependence, using this as a case through which to introduce and explore what we take to be central but underdeveloped questions about how infrastructures and complexes of social practice connect across space and time. I co-authored it with Elizabeth Shove and with Nicola Spurling and it was published in the European Journal of Social Theoryin 2015

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Can the Tour de France help get more people out of their cars and on to bikes?

Re-posted from the Geography Lives blog

The Tour de France is one of the world’s sporting mega-events and its temporary colonisation of the roads of Sheffield will inevitably give cycling an unprecedented profile in the city. Can it, though, be expected to help get more people out of their cars and on to their bikes?

Read more on the blog: Can the Tour de France help get more people out of their cars and on to bikes?

A spatial microsimulation approach for the analysis of commuter patterns: from individual to regional levels

Open access version here

In this paper we contend that new approaches are needed to advance knowledge about the social and geographical factors that relate to the diversity of commuter patterns, if policies targeted to specific individuals or places are to be effective. I co-authored it with Robin Lovelace, and with Dimitris Ballas, and it was published in the Journal of Transport Geography in 2014.

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Saints and slackers: challenging discourses about the decline of domestic cooking

Open access version available here

In this article we contest narratives of the deskilling of home food provisioning, based on multi-generational  research. I co-authored it with Angela Meah and it was published in the online journal Sociological Review Online in 2011.

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Locating anxiety in the social

Open access version here

Drawing on current research about food-related anxieties, this article argues for an expanded understanding of the presence and location of anxiety in the social. It contends that anxiety is usefully conceptualised as collective and distributed, rather than solely as a property or experience of the individual. I co-authored it with Peter Jackson and with Nick Piper and it was published in the European Journal of Cultural Studies  in 2013

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