Uganda field class

20171105122117_2.JPGSecond international field class of the year (the Geographer’s live), this time helping staff the undergraduate field class to Uganda, ably led by Dan Hammett.

A group of 20 students worked hard over the week in Uganda, focused around doing empirical work with people living in informal settlements in Jinja, Uganda’s second city. This was in partnership with local NGO Working as Angels, who made it possible for the students to work with people in a wide range of life and livelihood circumstances. In the process, students learn a great deal. Inevitably they learn more about the challenges – practical, ethical and emotional – of conducting research in situation like this; and probably more about themselves; than they can about the lived experience of poverty.  Continue reading “Uganda field class”

Policy reports delivered to project partners from Reshaping the Domestic Nexus project

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Four Reports are now online, following delivery to the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy; the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; the Food Standards Agency; and Waterwise. These were the main deliverables from the Reshaping the Domestic Nexus project.

Power, policy and relationality – panel at ECPR Oslo

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I was part of a genuinely complementary and productive conference panel – all too rare an experience – at the 2018 conference of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) in Oslo. My pretty abstract paper, from my chapter Placing Power in Practice Theory was in a session with Roy Heidelberg, who talked on accountability and technology; Simon West with an ethnographically grounded account of the doing of adaptive natural resource management; and Guy Riveros on the emergence of the ‘school leader’ as part of the transformation of education policy and its enactment.

 

Energy in the city summer school

 

CaptureTalking once again on understanding the relations between infrastructural change, changes to daily life, and their consequences for energy demand, this time as one of the contributors to the ‘Energy in the City’ Summer School at Leeds University. Working through the argument of a journal article recently back from review, and getting participants’ input into it, really helped push along my thinking on ‘infrastructuration’.  A full report of the event is here. Continue reading “Energy in the city summer school”

Gala fun at Lancaster University

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Representatives of the 6 End Use Energy Demand (EUED) Research Centres funded by the UK Energy Research programme gathered in Lancaster to share research learning. I was there as part of the DEMAND centre, which was hosting the event. There’s a report of the event here and materials including presentations are here.

Continue reading “Gala fun at Lancaster University”

Keynote on power at ‘Moving Practice Forward’ workshop

I had a fantastically generative time discussing my ideas on how to tackle power through practice theory as a keynote speaker for this year’s Warwick Advanced Workshop on Practice Based Studies. Based on my chapter, I spoke over a 2.5 hour session. It was though far from a monologue; I never talked for long without another well informed and apposite intervention from this group of critically engaged scholars. Questions and critique came from the wide range of perspectives and approaches represented at this international event. Continue reading “Keynote on power at ‘Moving Practice Forward’ workshop”

Lessons from a local history of domestic heating in the UK

Open access available here

Published online today by Energy Research and Social Science

This article, which I co-authored with Dr Lenneke Kuijer, uses detailed analysis of historical change across infrastructures and practices reveals processes underpinning increasing demand for heat in UK homes. It draws on archive work, oral histories and focus groups as part of our work with the DEMAND research centre. Highlighting how phenomena including spatial differentiation within the home, processes of automation and the emergence of novel practice fuelled demand for heat, it demonstrates how a focus on patterns of practice reveals new insights into energy demand, including new insights for contemporary energy policy.

Open access available here

Continue reading “Lessons from a local history of domestic heating in the UK”